Video: Fayetteville City Council To Weigh Public Drinking Ordinance

Today, the Fayetteville City Council reportedly will consider an ordinance to allow public drinking at certain events.

Family Council has put together a free toolkit to help citizens oppose public drinking ordinances like Fayetteville’s. You can download it here.

You can read Fayetteville’s proposed public drinking ordinance here.

Watch the video below to learn more.

Fayetteville City Council to Weigh Public Drinking

Fayetteville’s proposed district in which public drinking would be allowed at certain events and as-permitted by Fayetteville’s mayor.

This Tuesday, August 20, the Fayetteville City Council reportedly will consider a proposal to legalize public drinking throughout the city’s arts district.

Earlier this year the Arkansas Legislature passed Act 812 by Sen. Trent Garner (R – El Dorado) and Rep. Sonia Barker (R – Smackover). The new law — which took effect last month — lets cities create “entertainment districts” where alcohol can be carried and consumed publicly on streets and sidewalks.

Fayetteville’s proposed ordinance would allow public drinking at:

  • The Fayetteville Farmer’s Market each Saturday during the market’s hours of operation
  • Fayetteville’s First Thursday activities
  • Lights of the Ozarks, which is a festival of “holiday lights” that begins on the Saturday before Thanksgiving, and lasts until New Year’s Eve.
  • Any other event where public drinking is authorized by the Mayor of Fayetteville via a special permit.

Alcohol may be purchased and carried and consumed on streets and sidewalks using marked 16 oz. cups during these events.

A memo accompanying the proposed ordinance makes it clear that this is simply the beginning, and in the future the city could expand the times and places that people drink publicly on streets and sidewalks.

As we keep saying, letting people drink on city streets and sidewalks won’t improve the economy in our communities. Public drinking raises serious concerns about public safety.

Cities like Memphis and New Orleans have had significant problems with violence in their entertainment districts.

These districts also raise serious concerns about drunk driving in our communities.

Family Council has put together a free toolkit to help citizens oppose public drinking ordinances like Fayetteville’s.

Our toolkit contains talking points, information about problems public drinking has caused in other states, photographs of public drinking districts elsewhere around the country, and other resources you can use to fight public drinking in your community.

Click here to download our free toolkit.

AR Lottery Scholarship Funding Nears Five-Year Low

Last week the Arkansas Lottery released its financial statements for the month of July.

The report shows the Lottery took in over $41.2 million last month, but gave only $4.5 million to college scholarships — 11% of the Lottery’s total revenue for the month.

The Lottery’s scholarship budget for a single month hasn’t been this bad since February of 2016, when the Arkansas Lottery paid less than $4.5 million to scholarships.

As far as we can tell, July was the Arkansas Lottery’s third-worst month in the past five years when it came to scholarship funding.

The Arkansas Lottery made, on average, over $1.3 million every day last month. There’s simply no good reason the Lottery can’t give students more than 11 cents out of every dollar.

Below is a breakdown of Arkansas Lottery revenue and scholarship funding from the past five years.

Month Gross Lottery Revenue Paid to Scholarships % Gross Revenue
July, 2014 30,925,067.43 5,928,447.99 19.2%
August 31,571,412.10 5,296,965.80 16.8%
September 30,710,493.31 4,317,227.10 14.1%
October 32,959,739.29 5,939,625.59 18.0%
November 30,617,278.28 5,577,035.16 18.2%
December 34,507,731.54 5,474,318.77 15.9%
January, 2015 35,433,619.67 7,287,773.28 20.6%
February 41,770,314.46 6,161,343.01 14.8%
March 37,367,453.25 6,898,524.35 18.5%
April 33,866,970.54 5,881,005.95 17.4%
May 35,689,036.10 5,409,050.48 15.2%
June 33,815,559.59 8,278,928.14 24.5%
July 31,665,651.14 5,784,683.09 18.3%
August 31,265,177.55 5,490,094.00 17.6%
September 36,134,389.63 6,624,967.11 18.3%
October 35,261,533.80 6,020,642.32 17.1%
November 32,226,599.28 5,725,139.09 17.8%
December 38,670,746.09 6,425,754.66 16.6%
January, 2016 58,746,249.00 13,831,359.75 23.5%
February 40,790,144.05 4,474,356.06 11.0%
March 40,579,421.05 5,758,892.84 14.2%
April 37,516,802.47 7,392,837.00 19.7%
May 38,485,146.05 6,606,164.94 17.2%
June 34,983,951.24 11,249,220.37 32.2%
July 38,237,293.92 8,714,386.39 22.8%
August 35,091,022.09 5,498,714.86 15.7%
September 33,113,391.64 5,773,076.42 17.4%
October 34,061,993.14 5,165,040.54 15.2%
November 37,042,079.72 6,570,979.51 17.7%
December 35,352,159.35 4,596,532.22 13.0%
January, 2017 37,062,291.39 7,947,546.21 21.4%
February 41,176,854.60 6,698,099.62 16.3%
March 43,405,541.56 6,204,704.75 14.3%
April 38,671,617.14 7,845,827.56 20.3%
May 38,185,263.61 7,068,770.18 18.5%
June 38,517,227.85 13,193,652.18 34.3%
July 36,885,396.81 6,661,762.99 18.1%
August 49,320,459.23 8,912,741.54 18.1%
September 36,405,731.14 6,755,333.93 18.6%
October 39,802,740.53 5,667,305.74 14.2%
November 36,186,107.78 6,691,228.00 18.5%
December 44,716,219.32 6,583,355.77 14.7%
January, 2018 44,063,056.11 8,230,861.00 18.7%
February 39,389,927.57 5,947,647.50 15.1%
March 53,523,320.61 7,945,570.02 14.8%
April 42,064,194.78 7,192,997.10 17.1%
May 40,447,182.69 8,037,624.80 19.9%
June 37,685,874.97 13,364,612.64 35.5%
July 42,413,352.70 5,066,628.73 11.9%
August 40,343,279.62 6,175,998.40 15.3%
September 35,198,809.72 7,783,450.82 22.1%
October 57,575,285.62 11,259,040.31 19.6%
November 37,700,016.00 6,821,411.01 18.1%
December 45,859,642.73 6,650,791.54 14.5%
January, 2019 40,574,813.28 7,848,495.62 19.3%
February 41,060,111.75 8,198,257.31 20.0%
March 51,988,380.67 8,552,307.04 16.5%
April 43,951,257.94 8,176,383.34 18.6%
May 41,158,346.08 8,396,193.42 20.4%
June 38,413,526.87 13,482,789.59 35.1%
July 41,239,173.79 4,523,930.75 11.0%